Category Archives: Events

Watch this Channel 12 preview of the Grand Avenue Festival!

Glendale hosts Catlin Court Historic Home Tour Nov. 8

[Source: KKAT TV] — Have you driven through the Catlin Court Historic District and wondered what the beautiful bungalow homes looked like inside? Now is your chance to find out! Homeowners will open their doors for the Catlin Court Historic Home Tour on Saturday, Nov. 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is only the second time Catlin Court homes have been opened to the public. The tour will feature eleven historic homes in the beautiful historic neighborhood.

History buffs will delight in hearing stories of the neighborhood’s rich and fascinating past, which dates back to 1915. Co-founded by Otto R. Hansen, the neighborhood was named “Catlin Court” for his wife’s maiden name, and was one of Glendale’s earliest residential developments. Additional activities planned during the tour hearken back to Glendale’s earlier days, such as free horse-drawn carriage rides and a vintage car show.

Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 the day of the event. Tickets are available for purchase at Glendale’s Visitor Center, 5800 W. Glenn Dr., Suite 140, or online at the Catlin Court Website. The Visitor Center will be open that day, welcoming visitors and residents to discover many shopping and dining options in downtown Glendale before or after the tour. For more information, call 623-930-4500.

Four individuals receive coveted Arizona Architect Medals

[Source: Jan Buchholz, Phoenix Business Journal] — Architects from across Arizona celebrated the 50th anniversary of the state chapter of the American Institute of Architects at the Celebrate Architecture gala Sept. 27. The largest crowd in the group’s history, more than 500, turned out for the event at the Phoenix Arts Museum. “Since this was the 50th anniversary, we decided not to notify the winners ahead of time,” said Tina Litteral, executive vice president of AIA Arizona. “Since (no one) knew who was going to win, I think they were a little nervous.” AIA introduced a new tradition by commissioning artists Gary Beals and Mayme Kratz to create works of art to represent the awards. [Note: To read the full article, click here.]

Catlin Court historic home tour Nov. 8

Saturday November 8th is the 2008 Catlin Court historic home tour in Glendale, Arizona. From Myrtle to Orangewood, 59th Avenue to 57th Avenue. Tour 10 homes from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. There will be carriage rides and vintage cars. Tickets are $10 each and may be purchased online at the Catlin Court homepage.

Project gathers Scottsdale photos of past for exhibit

[Source: Julie Janovsky, Tribune] — JoAnn Handley remembers a time when the area now known as Scottsdale Fashion Square was nothing more than dirt roads and rodeo shows. “I could not have imagined 50 years ago Scottsdale could look like this,” said Handley, 77, a lifelong resident and manager of the Scottsdale Historical Museum. A new exhibit being planned for this spring at Scottsdale’s Civic Center Library will soon give visitors and locals alike a chance to take a deeper glimpse into the city’s past. The proposed exhibit will be one of the end results of a new historical archiving project sponsored by the Scottsdale Public Library system that will entail digitizing vintage photos from the collections of the Scottsdale Historical Museum, the Scottsdale Jaycees and the Scottsdale Charros. [Note: To read the full article, click here.]

Glendale receives accolades for parks programs, people, facilities

[Source: Yourwestvalley.com] — Glendale’s programs, people and facilities received awards at the annual Arizona Parks and Recreation Association awards banquet Aug. 27. Two programs, one facility and two people involved with the Glendale Parks and Recreation Department were awarded. The 2008 Community/Neighborhood Special Event Award for Populations Over 100,000 went to GlendOberfest (pictured), the city’s annual fall festival. GlendOberfest on Oct. 31, 2007, at Sahuaro Ranch Park Historic Area, encouraged residents to journey back in time to the late 1800s to an atmosphere of Old Towne Glendale with dirt roads, dark and dense citrus groves and old farm houses backlit by the moon and filled with scary shadows moving across the landscape.

[Note: To read the full article, click here. Photo source: Mother Nature’s Farm.]

Advancing Sustainability Conference in Phoenix, September 5-6

[Source: Green Summit] — The Advancing Sustainability Conference is the prime educational component of the GreenSummit. This conference covers a variety of topics relating to how the concept of “going green” impacts our region’s various industries, the communities we live in, and the natural environment around us. Industry experts, Arizona State University, and our Summit Alliance partners help provide guidance and support to maximize the learning opportunities of this unique and powerful event.

Educational content caters to both business professionals and the general public. The Advancing Sustainability Conference has something for everyone attending GreenSummit. Most of the general level sessions within each conference track are free for all attendees. Beyond the introductory level session, the track becomes more oriented towards professionals wishing to have a deeper understanding of the content. For more information and to register for the conference, click here.

Pecos Conference in Flagstaff August 7-10

The purpose of the Pecos Conference, as Alfred Vincent Kidder put it in summing up the first such gathering, is to “…bring about contact between workers in the Southwest field to discuss fundamental problems of Southwestern prehistory; and to formulate problems of Southwest prehistory; to pool knowledge of facts and techniques, and to lay a foundation for a unified system of nomenclature.” Deliberately informal, the Pecos Conference affords Southwestern archaeologists a superlative opportunity to talk with one another, both by presenting field reports and by casual discussions. It is a chance to see old friends, meet new ones, pick up fresh information, organize future conferences, and have a great time. In recent years, Native Americans, avocational archaeologists, the general public and media organizations have come to play an increasingly important role, serving as participants and as audience, to celebrate archaeological research and to mark cultural continuity. For more information on the Pecos Conference, click here.

Sept. 9 course in Phoenix: "Green strategies for historic buildings"

[Source: Carol Griffith, Arizona State Parks] — The destruction of an existing building and the procurement and transport of materials to build a new building is less energy efficient (uses more energy and resources) than making an existing building more energy efficient. The State Historic Preservation Office is partnering with the National Preservation Institute to have a course taught in Phoenix on “Green Strategies for Historic Buildings,” September 9, 2008. AIA credits will apply. For more information, click here.

Sedona’s Homolovi Ruins State Park celebrates Suvoyuki Day

[Source: Ellen Bilbrey, Gateway to Sedona] — “Suvoyuki” translated in the Hopi language means to accomplish work through at “joint effort.” “Suvoyuki Day” is an open house day at Homolovi Ruins State Park that celebrates the partners who have helped to protect and save Homolovi area archaeological and cultural sites from destruction. The event begins on Friday, July 11, at 7 p.m., with a talk about the Hopi culture.

On Saturday, July 12, the day begins at 6 a.m., with a traditional Hopi morning run (4 and 6.5 miles) with all participants invited. Following the run, the Hopi corn roasting pit will be opened and all will get a taste of freshly roasted sweet corn. Throughout the day, there will be Hopi artist demonstrations, traditional food demonstrations and lectures. Archaeologists will also be there to interpret the sites. Parking will be available on the northeast corner of Interstate 40 and State Route 87. Shuttle service will then be available from there to the park. [Note: To read the full article, click here.]