Category Archives: Arizona Most Endangered Historic Places

Meeting with Owner of Phoenix’s White Gates / Al Beadle House

[Source: Barbara Stocklin, City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Office] — Historic Preservation staff met with Lynda Maze, owner of the house at 4918 E. White Gates Drive, which was designed and occupied by noted modern architect Alfred Newman Beadle. The property was listed on the Arizona Preservation Foundation’s list of most endangered places in Arizona, due to the fact that the house is vacant and has been gutted and the lot has been cleared of vegetation. The property has also been cited by the Neighborhood Services Department for property maintenance violations. Ms. Maze recently purchased the house to try to rehabilitate it, and has requested assistance from the Historic Preservation Office. Rich Fairbourn of Build Inc., a former colleague of Beadle, and Peter Wolf, a writer familiar with Beadle’s work, also attended the meeting. Mr. Fairbourn will prepare plans for the rehabilitation and provide cost estimates for the work. Ms. Maze will likely submit a grant application and request city historic designation.

Seligman’s Harvey House is history

[Source: Mark Boardman, True West] — In January, we wrote about ongoing efforts to save the historic Havasu Harvey House in Seligman, Arizona. Today, the circa 1905 building is gone, demolished by its owner, the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railroad. For years, the BNSF has wanted to tear down the empty hotel, which closed in the mid-1950s. Local group Friends of Havasu looked for ways to buy it. The railroad offered to donate it to anybody who would move it. Nothing came of the offer, and the Havasu came down in May 2008. The salvaged historic items were given to Seligman Historical Society. Our thanks to Dan Lutzick for the info and picture. Dan is project supervisor for the renovation of the El Garces Harvey Hotel in Needles, California. The $10-million effort includes a restaurant, visitors center, museum and hotel. He hopes to have it finished by the end of this year, just in time to celebrate the building’s 100th anniversary.

City of Tucson urged anew to take over, repair old Marist adobe

[Source: Rob O’Dell, Daily Star] — Racing against a ticking clock, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson is again trying to give the crumbling adobe Marist College building to the city, in hopes it will save the 93-year-old Downtown building from collapse. The diocese and the city have for years had informal negotiations over the three-story building on the northwest corner of the St. Augustine Cathedral square, but neither party wants to pay the $1 million minimum cost to stabilize the building.

Now the diocese has offered to raise about $250,000 toward making the building structurally sound, although the city still hasn’t jumped on the deal because of the price tag and the uncertainty of what the building would be used for once it is stabilized. The diocese is also offering to include a portion of the St. Augustine parking lot across from the Tucson Convention Center, according to an e-mail from City Historic Preservation Officer Jonathan Mabry John Shaheen, diocese property and insurance director, said the church does not have the money to stabilize the Marist building, which housed a Catholic school from 1915 to 1968.

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Scottsdale’s Kerr Center gains historic status

[Source: Julie Janovsky, Tribune] — The Kerr Cultural Center in Scottsdale will finally take its place on Scottsdale’s historic register. After months of negotiations between Arizona State University and the city, the Scottsdale City Council Tuesday night unanimously approved to accept a historic conservation easement that will protect the exterior of the center’s two adobe buildings and less than one-third of the property’s 1.65 acres, for the next 50 years.

Advocates for the nearly 50-year-old cultural center at 6110 N. Scottsdale Road – which philanthropist Louise Lincoln Kerr willed to ASU upon her death in 1977 – said the easement was a step in the right direction, but could be stronger. Submitting a petition bearing nearly 1,000 signatures supporting the conservation easement to the council, Patricia Myers, co-chairwoman of the Concerned Citizens for the Kerr Cultural Center group, told council members she feels ASU could do more. “We support the City Council’s vote in favor of the conservation easement. But we would like to see future discussions that would add the entire acreage willed to ASU and its specific usage as a cultural center,” said Myers.

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